In 2013, Aaron Dietz will produce 12 books in 12 months. Find out more here.

Splitting War and Peace into Just the War and Just the Peace: Origin of the Idea

Posted: January 21st, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Other People | 7 Comments »

A couple years ago, I came up with the idea of separating Tolstoy’s War and Peace into two volumes. Then I went ahead and did that (Just the War, Just the Peace, Emergency Press 2013).

But I didn’t get the idea out of the blue. I got it from my friend, Lauren Hoffman, who once told me she didn’t read all of War and Peace–just the “peace” parts. And she apparently didn’t get the idea on her own, either. Recently, she reminded me that she got it from reading Lois Lowry’s Anastasia at this Address. Read the rest of this entry »


12 Books in 12 Months? Almost

Posted: January 7th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Long, Other People, Serious | 6 Comments »

In 2013, I spent most of my free hours working on the 12 in 12 project. It’s a project in which I attempted to produce 12 books in just 12 months. I finished the year with nine. Overall, I’m happy with that. After all, it took 10 years to write and produce my first novel, Super. Nine in one year is amazing. Read the rest of this entry »


Just the War, Just the Peace: Tolstoy’s Famous Work Separated at Last

Posted: December 10th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Events, Long, Other People, Serious, With Pictures | 2 Comments »

While I was working on splitting Tolstoy’s War and Peace into the two separate books, Just the War, and Just the Peace, I would occasionally tell people what I was up to, and most people would laugh and think it was a joke. And it was a joke! A very funny one, too! But I didn’t let that stop me from actually doing it. Just the War, Just the Peace is now available from Emergency Press. Both volumes are sold in one simple ebook, in most of the major ebook formats (Amazon, Apple, Barnes & Noble–I believe Google is coming soon). At $0.99, it’s a bargain!

Just the War, Just the Peace

 

Read the rest of this entry »


Wiggins Doesn’t Need to Live Up to Your Expectations

Posted: December 2nd, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Other People, Serious | No Comments »

In case you’re not following Andrew Wiggins’ basketball career, I’ll give you a quick update. He’s possibly the best basketball player of his age, or at least could potentially one day be. Right now, he’s a Freshman playing at Kansas University, but will likely be a very high draft pick in the 2014 NBA draft.

When you’re as good at basketball as Andrew Wiggins is, some people expect you to score all the points and have a big game every time you play. Contrary to this expectation, Wiggins has not had a big game every time out so far this season. Jay Williams even quoted an anonymous NBA scout who implied that Wiggins has no skills. Tyler Brooke and others have chimed in with articles about the need for Wiggins to be more assertive.

But let me tell you, news people and basketball fans whom Wiggins apparently is disappointing: Wiggins does not need to live up to your expectations.

Read the rest of this entry »


Super for the iPad

Posted: October 12th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Long, Other People, Serious, Super Blog Posts, With Pictures | 1 Comment »

My novel, Super, is now available on the iPad, which fills me with tremendous joy–not only is it wonderful to see my book in one of the most prominent “bookstores” on the planet, it’s also wonderful to finally be able to present the book in a format that can handle the interactive needs of much of Super‘s content.

Super in the iBookstore

But of course it’s not all about fancy features and interactivity. Sometimes it’s just nice to see elements from the book with a little color.

Danger RBZ - Recommended Battle Zone: Whenever possible, shift the location of combat to the nearest Recommended Battle Zone (RBZ). RBZ's are areas that have a decreased likelihood of civilian casualties and a stronger change of minimizing property damage.

Does the RBZ sign really need to be in red? Yes. It really does need to be in red. The black-and-white printed interior of the paperback version is fine–but it doesn’t have a red RBZ sign.

Read the rest of this entry »


Charlie Potter Named 12 in 12 Art Director; Publishers Interested in Multiple Titles (a 12 in 12 Update)

Posted: February 11th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Long, Other People, Serious, With Pictures | 5 Comments »

I’m super happy to announce that Charlie Potter has officially joined the 12 in 12 project as Art Director. This means that he’ll be responsible for producing the covers for 11 of the 12 titles (one of the titles will be put out by Uno Kudo, the non-profit organization headed by designer Erin McParland), as well as oversee the development of any guest art included in the project. For one or two of the titles, he’ll do some interior illustrations also.

Charlie Potter is the brilliant book designer for Super, a book that required an intense amount of design in simulating physical documents as well as emulating the look of a corporate superhero environment (letterheads, etc.). As part of promoting Super, Charlie also developed posters, desktop backgrounds, stickers, props for the trailers, and more! Read the rest of this entry »


Yes We Can – What, You Meant Me?

Posted: December 8th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Other People, Serious | 2 Comments »

Let me tell you what happened.

First, we got Obama elected. We woke up the next day and everything felt nice, happy, safer, and even loving.

Then we all forgot about politics for a while. We had worked hard to get him elected. We deserved a break. The President was going to take care of us, so what the heck–we could take it easy now.

That’s what we figured.

And so for a while, we thought, “Yes we can.”

But now we’re like, “What, you meant me?”


How to Avoid a Farmer’s Tan

Posted: September 6th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Documentation, Funny, Other People | No Comments »

It’s 1993 or so. Summer. I’m working in a corn field, with Dave.

Dave says, “I hate getting a farmer’s tan.”

I say, “Then roll up your sleeves.”

He rolls up the sleeves on his t-shirt. “It’s kind of uncomfy,” he says.

“It’s an old t-shirt that you probably don’t care about. Just tear your sleeves off. That’s what I do.”

He grabs a sleeve and pulls. His shirt rips down the middle of his chest. The rest of the morning it hangs on him by one shoulder.

We come in to the shed for lunch. Our boss gives Dave a weird look.

Dave says, “Don’t ask.”


Bellesouth Talks Unemployment, Godliness, and How to Become a Paid Blogger

Posted: August 29th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Long, Other People, Random | No Comments »

I’ve known Eleanor Evans of Bellesouth since 2005 through the social networking site known as MySpace and other social networking sites. Over just a few short years, she’s actually figured out how to make money at blogging, a fact I am in awe of. She was also a strong member of the Super Action Team, a group of amazing marketers and social networking gurus who volunteered to help me promote my novel, Super.

It is with great pleasure that I present an interview with Bellesouth’s industrious and brilliant creator, Eleanor Evans, in which she answers critical questions about unemployment, godliness, and how to become a paid blogger.

Aaron Dietz: When we first communicated about doing an interview you said something about pretending it’s a Barbara Walters Special, so I watched some of those to prepare. And if I may, I’d like to steal some questions from her, starting with the following:

At one point I heard that you thought you might do a show like The View. Is that true?* Read the rest of this entry »


Ben Loory’s Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day

Posted: July 25th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Other People | 2 Comments »

The cover of Ben Loory's Stories for Nighttime and Some for the DayBen Loory’s Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day is a book of fairy tales for adults. Kind of. The tales have this sort of secret ingredient in them that makes you feel incredibly wise when you read the book. Like, while you’re reading it, you might think, “Of course I don’t know why that man did that thing in this story, but I feel like I’m almost smart enough to figure it out even though it’s an unsolvable puzzle. Take that, person-who-got-better-grades-than-me-in-elementary-school.”

When Ben Loory read a piece from the book in Denver, my girlfriend and I both cried. When Ben Loory sent me the manuscript for a blurb, I held it in my heart each night for a summer while my girlfriend was in Taiwan. Oh, to get through the day and have stories from this book awaiting you!

Here’s the blurb I wrote: Read the rest of this entry »